1 Corinthians

December 13, 2019

1 Corinthians 13 – 2019-12-13

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 13 – COMMENTARY

    Introduction:

    “More important than all the gifts is love (12:31b).  First Corinthians 13:1-3 makes the point that without love the gifts are worthless.  Verses 4-7 describe the nature of love, in language designed to point out how little the Corinthians are measuring up.  Verses 8-13 highlight the temporary nature of all gifts, contrasting with love’s permanence.”[1]

    “If it is more excellent than even the greater gifts, then love itself cannot be a spiritual gift. Rather it represents the cardinal Christian virtue, the first on the list of the ‘fruit’ of the Spirit (Gal. 5:22), which must be present with all the gifts if they are to be used in ways that will please God and have eternal value. The key to understanding chapter 13, then, is to keep it in its context. Whatever inspiration it may have as a self-contained poem or hymn to love, Paul intended it to be used to help solve the specific problem of the destructive manner in which the Corinthians were using their spiritual gifts.”[2] 

    v.1tongues of men and of angels.  Paul uses hyperbole.  Even if he could speak not only the various languages that human beings speak but even the languages used by angels—if he did not speak in love, it would be nothing but noise.”[3]

    v.2All mysteries and all knowledge.  Again Paul uses hyperbole to express the amount of understanding possessed.  Even if he is gifted with unlimited knowledge—if he does not possess and exercise that knowledge in love, he is nothing. 

    Faith that can move mountains.  A special capacity to trust God to remove or overcome overwhelming threats or insurmountable obstacles.  Again Paul uses hyperbole.”[4]

    v.3Surrender my body to the flames.  A reference to suffering martyrdom through burning at the stake, as many early Christians experienced.  Even the supreme sacrifice, if not motivated by love, accomplishes nothing.”[5]

    vv.4-7 “Taken together, verses 4-7 clearly portray love as selfless, seeking the good of the other first and foremost. ‘Love is what God in Christ has shown and done for “others” in their helpless plight and hapless estate as sinners.  In love we take God’s side, share his outlook and implement his designs; and we treat our neighbors as we know God has treated us (see Rom. 15:1-7).’”[6]

    v.6Love does not delight in evil.  ‘It might be better to translate this that love finds no pleasure in anything that is wrong.  It is not so much delight in doing the wrong thing that is meant, as the malicious pleasure which comes to most of us when we hear something derogatory about someone else.  It is one of the[…] traits of human nature that very often we prefer to hear of the misfortune of others rather than of their good fortune.  It is much easier to weep with them that weep than to rejoice with those who rejoice.  Christian love has none of that human malice which finds pleasure in ill reports.’”[7]

    v.7always trusts.  ‘This characteristic has a twofold aspect. (i) In relation to God it means that love takes God at his word, and can take every promise which begins “Whosoever” and say, “That means me.” (ii) In relation to our fellow men it means that love always believes the best about other people.  It is often true that we make people what we believe them to be.  If we show that we do not trust people, we may make them untrustworthy.  If we show people that we trust them absolutely, we may make them trustworthy.’”[8]

    “The other two claims of v.7—‘love believes all things; hopes all things’—tie faith and hope to love in anticipation of v.13.  It is not surprising that faith (the same Greek term for the verb ‘believe’) and hope should appear here together; they are inextricably tied in Paul’s thoughts (cf. Gal 5:5-6; 1 Thess 1:3; 5:8).  Faith, right relationship with God, is the basis on which one has hope regarding the future, because, through faith, one knows God’s redemption in the present, one can hope—that is, one can confidently look to the future in anticipation of God’s completing the work that God has begun in the present (cf. Phil 2:12b-13).

    “Love’s believing all things describes neither a willing disregard for reality nor naïveté nor gullibility.  It is probably best to take this statement as a posture of openness along the lines of 2 Cor 5:7: ‘We walk through faith, not through sight.’  Certainly, to hope all things must be grounded in this confidence in God toward the future, a confidence whose basis is neither visible nor directly knowable, a theme to which Paul returns in 13:12.”[9]

    vv.8-13 “Verse 8 states the thesis of verses 8-13.  Again, Paul makes the point with sample gifts that were of particular importance in Corinth.  Whereas faith, hope, and love endure, spiritual gifts prove temporary[…]

    “Why will the gifts cease?  It is because they are imperfect provisions for an imperfect world, rendered unnecessary when perfection comes (vv.9-10).  But to what does ‘perfection’ refer?  The other main biblical meaning of the word (Gk. teleios) is ‘maturity’ (cf. the metaphor in v.11), but neither perfection nor consistent maturity has yet come to the church of Jesus Christ.”[10]

    v.10 “God gives us spiritual gifts for our lives on earth in order to build up, serve, and strengthen fellow Christians. The spiritual gifts are for the church. In eternity, we will be made perfect and complete and will be in the very presence of God. We will no longer need the spiritual gifts, so they will come to an end.”[11]

    v.12 “Paul offers a glimpse into the future to give us hope that one day we will be complete when we see God face to face. This truth should strengthen our faith—we don’t have all the answers now, but one day we will. Someday we will see Christ in person and be able to see with God’s perspective.”[12] 

    [1] Craig L. Blomberg, 1 Corinthians, The NIV Application Commentary Series (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994) 258

    [2] Craig L. Blomberg, 1 Corinthians, The NIV Application Commentary Series (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994) 261.

    [3] The NIV Study Bible, Study Notes (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2002) 1793.

    [4] The NIV Study Bible, Study Notes (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2002) 1793.

    [5] The NIV Study Bible, Study Notes (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2002) 1793.

    [6] Craig L. Blomberg, 1 Corinthians, The NIV Application Commentary Series (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994) 259

    [7] William Barclay, 1 Corinthians, Daily Study Bible Series, Rev.ed. (Philadelphia:  Westminster Press, 1975) 122-123.

    [8] William Barclay, 1 Corinthians, Daily Study Bible Series, Rev.ed. (Philadelphia:  Westminster Press, 1975) 123.

    [9] Paul J. Sampley, “The First Letter to the Corinthians,” The New Interpreter’s Bible, Vol. X (Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press, 2002) 953-954.

    [10] Craig L. Blomberg, 1 Corinthians, The NIV Application Commentary Series (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994) 260

    [11] Quest Study Bible, notes on v.10 (Grand Rapids, MI:  Zondervan Publishing House, 1994) 1585.

    [12] Quest Study Bible, notes on v.12 (Grand Rapids, MI:  Zondervan Publishing House, 1994) 1585.

  • BIBLE TEXT: 1 Corinthians 13:1-3 (ESV) 

    1 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. 2 And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3 If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing.

  • God [What truths about God’s person, activity or character does the text reveal?]

  • Lessons/insights 

  • Apply and obey [How does today’s text apply to me? How will I obey or respond to the truths from today’s text?]

  • Prayer 

December 12, 2019

1 Corinthians 12 – 2019-12-12

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 12 – COMMENTARY

  • BIBLE TEXT: 1 Corinthians 12:21-31 (ESV) 

    21 The eye cannot say to the hand, “I have no need of you,” nor again the head to the feet, “I have no need of you.” 22 On the contrary, the parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable, 23 and on those parts of the body that we think less honorable we bestow the greater honor, and our unpresentable parts are treated with greater modesty, 24 which our more presentable parts do not require. But God has so composed the body, giving greater honor to the part that lacked it, 25 that there may be no division in the body, but that the members may have the same care for one another. 26 If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together.

    27 Now you are the body of Christ and individually members of it. 28 And God has appointed in the church first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healing, helping, administrating, and various kinds of tongues. 29 Are all apostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers? Do all work miracles? 30 Do all possess gifts of healing? Do all speak with tongues? Do all interpret? 31 But earnestly desire the higher gifts.

    And I will show you a still more excellent way.

  • God [What truths about God’s person, activity or character does the text reveal?]

  • Lessons/insights 

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  • Prayer 

December 11, 2019

1 Corinthians 12 – 2019-12-11

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 12 – COMMENTARY

  • BIBLE TEXT: 1 Corinthians 12:12-20 (ESV) 

    12 For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ. 13 For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body—Jews or Greeks, slaves or free—and all were made to drink of one Spirit.

    14 For the body does not consist of one member but of many. 15 If the foot should say, “Because I am not a hand, I do not belong to the body,” that would not make it any less a part of the body. 16 And if the ear should say, “Because I am not an eye, I do not belong to the body,” that would not make it any less a part of the body. 17 If the whole body were an eye, where would be the sense of hearing? If the whole body were an ear, where would be the sense of smell? 18 But as it is, God arranged the members in the body, each one of them, as he chose. 19 If all were a single member, where would the body be? 20 As it is, there are many parts, yet one body.

  • God [What truths about God’s person, activity or character does the text reveal?]

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  • Prayer 

December 10, 2019

1 Corinthians 12 – 2019-12-10

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 12 – COMMENTARY

    Introduction:

    “Within chapter 12, Paul begins with an introduction highlighting the basic criterion for distinguishing the work of the Holy Spirit from that of other spirits (vv.1-3). Verses 4-6 then ground the diversity of spiritual gifts within the unity of the Triune Godhead. Verses 7-11 offer samples of the diverse gifts, while stressing that each comes from the same sovereign Spirit.  Verses 12-26 develop in more detail the metaphor of the body of Christ, while verses 27-31 bring the chapter to a close with a second representative list of gifts which stresses that not one of them is given to all Christians. ‘The successive waves of Paul’s argument may be summed up as follows: (1) not disunity, but (2) unity; yet unity (3) not uniformity, but (4) of mutual concern and love.’”[1]

    v.1 “A ‘spiritual’ gift is some capability given through the Holy Spirit that enables one to minister to the needs of Christ’s body, the church.”[2]

    v.3 “The word for Lord was kurios and it was a tremendous word.  It was the official title of the Roman Emperor. The demand of the persecutors always was, ‘Say, “Caesar is Lord (kurios).”’ It was the word by which the sacred name Jehovah was rendered in the Greek translation of the Old Testament scriptures. When a man could say, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ it meant that he gave to Jesus the supreme loyalty of his life and the supreme worship of his heart. It is to be noted that Paul believed that a man could say, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ only when the Spirit enabled him to say it. The Lordship of Jesus was not so much something which he discovered for himself as something which God, in his grace, revealed to him.”[3]

    vv.12-20 “‘You,’ he says, ‘are the body of Christ.’  There is tremendous thought here.  Christ is no longer in this world in the body; therefore if he wants a task done within the world he has to find a man to do it.  […]  Literally, we have to be the body of Christ, hands to do his work, feet to run upon his errands, a voice to speak for him.  […]  Here is the supreme glory of the Christian man–he is part of the body of Christ upon earth.”[4]

    “So Paul draws a picture of the unity which should exist inside the Church if it is to fulfill its proper function.  A body is healthy and efficient only when each part is functioning perfectly.  The parts of the body are not jealous of each other and do not covet each other’s functions.  From Paul’s picture we see certain things which ought to exist in the Church, the body of Christ.”[5]

    vv.12-26 “Paul develops the extended metaphor of the church as the body of Christ.  […]He follows up an initial statement of the metaphor (v.12) by moving from the theme of unity (v.13) to diversity (v.14), and then describes in more detail first diversity (vv.15-21) and then unity (vv.22-26).”[6]

    vv.21-26  “We ought to realize that we need each other.  There can be no such thing as isolation in the Church.  […] In the body there is no question of relative importance.  If any limb or any organ ceases to function, the whole body is thrown out of gear.  It is so with the Church.  ‘All service ranks the same with God.’  Whenever we begin to think about our own importance in the Christian Church, the possibility of really Christian work is gone.”[7]

    v.28 “To take ‘first,’ ‘second,’ and ‘third’ in verse 28 as a ranking in significance would clearly violate the whole point of Paul’s discussion thus far. So it is best to see in this enumeration a chronological priority (cf. Eph 2:20). To establish a local congregation requires a church-planter. Then the regular proclamation of God’s Word must ensue. Next teachers must supplement evangelism with discipleship and the passing on of the cardinal truths of the faith. Only at this point does a viable Christian fellowship exist to enable all the other gifts to come into play.”[8]

    v.31 “The most excellent way.  Paul now shows the right way to exercise all spiritual gifts—the way of love.  He does not identify love as a gift; rather, it is a fruit of the Spirit (Gal 5:22).”[9] 

    [1] Craig L. Blomberg, 1 Corinthians, The NIV Application Commentary Series (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994) 242-243.

    [2] The NIV Study Bible, Study Notes (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2002) 1804.

    [3] William Barclay, The Letters to the Corinthians, Daily Study Bible Commentary (Philadelphia, PN: Westminster Press, 1975) 107.

    [4] William Barclay, The Letters to the Corinthians, Daily Study Bible Commentary (Philadelphia, PN: Westminster Press, 1975) 113-114.

    [5] William Barclay, The Letters to the Corinthians, Daily Study Bible Commentary (Philadelphia, PN: Westminster Press, 1975) 114.

    [6] Craig L. Blomberg, 1 Corinthians, The NIV Application Commentary Series (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994) 245-246.

    [7] William Barclay, The Letters to the Corinthians, Daily Study Bible Commentary (Philadelphia, PN: Westminster Press, 1975) 114.

    [8] Craig L. Blomberg, 1 Corinthians, The NIV Application Commentary Series (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1994) 247.

    [9] The NIV Study Bible, Study Notes (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2002) 1793.

  • BIBLE TEXT:

    1 Corinthians 12:1-11 (ESV)

    1 Now concerning spiritual gifts, brothers, I do not want you to be uninformed. 2 You know that when you were pagans you were led astray to mute idols, however you were led. 3 Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says “Jesus is accursed!” and no one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit.

    4 Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; 5 and there are varieties of service, but the same Lord; 6 and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who empowers them all in everyone. 7 To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good. 8 For to one is given through the Spirit the utterance of wisdom, and to another the utterance of knowledge according to the same Spirit, 9 to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healing by the one Spirit, 10 to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another the ability to distinguish between spirits, to another various kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. 11 All these are empowered by one and the same Spirit, who apportions to each one individually as he wills.

  • God [What truths about God’s person, activity or character does the text reveal?]

  • Lessons/insights 

  • Apply and obey [How does today’s text apply to me? How will I obey or respond to the truths from today’s text?]

  • Prayer 

December 9, 2019

1 Corinthians 11 – 2019-12-09

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 11 –  COMMENTARY

  • BIBLE TEXT: 1 Corinthians 11:27-34 (ESV) 

    27 Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty concerning the body and blood of the Lord. 28 Let a person examine himself, then, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. 29 For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment on himself. 30 That is why many of you are weak and ill, and some have died. 31 But if we judged ourselves truly, we would not be judged. 32 But when we are judged by the Lord, we are disciplined so that we may not be condemned along with the world.

    33 So then, my brothers, when you come together to eat, wait for one another—

    34 if anyone is hungry, let him eat at home—so that when you come together it will not be for judgment. About the other things I will give directions when I come.

  • God [What truths about God’s person, activity or character does the text reveal?]

  • Lessons/insights 

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  • Prayer 

December 6, 2019

1 Corinthians 11 – 2019-12-06

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 11 –  COMMENTARY

  • BIBLE TEXT: 1 Corinthians 11:17-26 (ESV) 

    17 But in the following instructions I do not commend you, because when you come together it is not for the better but for the worse. 18 For, in the first place, when you come together as a church, I hear that there are divisions among you. And I believe it in part, 19 for there must be factions among you in order that those who are genuine among you may be recognized.            20 When you come together, it is not the Lord’s supper that you eat. 21 For in eating, each one goes ahead with his own meal. One goes hungry, another gets drunk. 22 What! Do you not have houses to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I commend you in this? No, I will not.

    23 For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, 24 and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body, which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” 25 In the same way also he took the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.” 26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

  • God [What truths about God’s person, activity or character does the text reveal?]

  • Lessons/insights 

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  • Prayer 

December 5, 2019

1 Corinthians 11 – 2019-12-05

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 11 –  COMMENTARY

  • vv.3-16 “This section focuses primarily on proper attitudes and conduct in worship, not on the marriage relationship or on the role of women in the church[…] If a believer’s actions offend members and could divide the church, then the believer should change his or her ways to promote church unity. Paul told the women who were not wearing head coverings to wear them, not because it was a scriptural command, but because it kept the congregation from dividing over a petty issue that took people’s focus off Christ.”[1]

    vv.4-5 “The covering or uncovering of the head is not merely a sign of individual freedom, Paul insists; rather, it signifies either respect or disrespect for one’s superior in the hierarchy.  Consequently, to display the literal head inappropriately attired in worship is to bring shame upon one’s figurative ‘head’.  If this seems off to modern readers, we might well remember that analogous customs persist in our social world.  For a man to show up at a formal dinner—or in church—wearing a baseball cap would be widely perceived as rude and irreverent.  In ancient Mediterranean culture such a breach of etiquette would bring disgrace not only on the perpetrator of the act but also on the ‘head’ to whom that person was responsible.  Thus, one of Paul’s concerns is that women who pray and prophesy with ‘uncovered’ heads are in effect shaming the men of the congregation.”[2]

    v.5 “The very mention of the word ‘veil’ by Paul would automatically indicate to the Corinthians that the females under discussion in this passage were married.  The veil indicated the women’s marital status.”[3]

    “Paul promulgates his teaching about head coverings for women not in order to restrict their participation in prayer and prophecy but rather to enable them to perform these activities with dignity, avoiding distractions for people whose cultural sensibilities were formed by the social conventions of the ancient Mediterranean world.”[4]

    “For women to have loose hair in public, however, was conventionally seen as shameful, a sign associated either with prostitutes or—perhaps worse from Paul’s point of view—with women caught up in the ecstatic worship practices of the cults associated with Dionysius, Cybele, and Isis.  Paul is concerned that the practice of Christian prophecy be sharply distinguished from the frenzied behavior of prophetesses in pagan worship (cf. 14:26-33, 37-40).  The symbolic confusion introduced by women with loose, disheveled hair in the Christian assembly would therefore be, from Paul’s point of view, shameful[…].”[5]

    v.10 “What does the idiom ‘to have authority upon her head’ mean, and what do ‘angels’ have to do with the argument? […] By telling the women to ‘take charge’ of their own heads, Paul seeks to transform the symbolic connotations of the head covering: the bound hair becomes a fitting symbol of the self-control and orderliness that Paul desires for the community as a whole.  But what about the angels? […]More likely is the hypothesis that Paul thinks of the angels as present with the worshipping community as guardians of order and as participants in the church’s praise to God; parallels to this idea can be found in the Dead Sea Scrolls.  Presumably, then, Paul means that the community ought to behave in a decorous manner because of the presence of these heavenly ‘dignitaries’ in their midst.”[6]

    vv.11-12 “But lest he be misunderstood as wanting to demote women, Paul now argues that man and woman are equal in the Lord and mutually dependent.”[7]

    v.11 “Even though social decorum requires women and men to maintain symbolic distinctions, and even though Paul contends that such distinctions have a basis in creation itself, nevertheless ‘in the Lord’ things are different.  Men and women live in mutual interdependence.  This does not mean that the differences between the sexes are abolished; it does mean, however, that they are both radically dependent on God and that they are called to livr4                  e as complementary partners in Christ.  These statements do not, as is sometimes claimed, contradict or revoke the position that Paul articulated in verses 3-10; rather, they render it more complex.  The hierarchical order that Paul sketched in verses 3 and 7-9 is counterbalanced by other considerations.  For example, the earlier statement that woman is ‘from man’ is now balanced by the argument that ‘man comes through woman’ in childbirth.  The result is that Paul supports a functional equality of men and women in the church.  Women are free to pray and prophesy and exercise leadership of all sorts through the guidance of the Spirit, so long as they maintain the external markers of gender difference, particularly with regard to head coverings.”[8]

  • vv. 17-19

    “A second abuse of worship existed in the Corinthian church regarding how to celebrate the Lord’s Supper.  Apparently, there was a division between the rich and the poor during the celebration of Communion itself.  This lack of unity caused the believers to lose the real meaning behind what they were remembering—the sacrifice of Jesus’ body on the cross.”[9]

    vv.20-22 “We must bear in mind that the Christian gatherings were held in private homes, not in large public places[…] The host of such a gathering would, of course, be one of the wealthier members of the community.  It is reasonable to assume, therefore, that the host’s higher-status friends would be invited to dine in the triclinium (dining room), while the lower-status members of the church (such as freedmen and slaves) would be placed in the larger space outside.  Furthermore, under such conditions it was not at all unusual for the higher-status guests in the dining room to be served better food and wine than the other guests[…] This is the sort of hospitality that was being provided to the church by the wealthier Corinthian Christians.  They may have considered themselves patrons of the community because they were hosting the gatherings, but they were continuing to observe status distinctions in the fare that was served.”[10]

    vv.23-26 “Thus, in Paul’s rendering of the tradition, two closely linked themes stand out: the sharing of the Supper calls the community to think of Jesus’ death for others, and that death is understood to initiate a new covenant.  To be in covenant relation with God is to belong to a covenant people bound together by responsibilities to God and to one another; the character of this new covenant should be shown forth in the sharing of the meal.  The trouble with the Corinthians is that they are celebrating the Supper in a way that disregards this structure of covenant obligations and demonstrates an odd amnesia about Jesus’ death.  By showing contempt for those who have nothing, they are acting as though his death had not decisively changed the conditions of their relationship to one another.  Paul therefore retells the story so as to spotlight the death of Jesus as the central meaning of the Supper.”[11]

    v.27 “The problem is not desecration of the sacred elements but rather offense against Christ himself.  The thought is similar to the idea expressed in 8:12: ‘When you sin against your brothers in this way…, you sin against Christ.’  By mistreating other members of the church, the Corinthians repeat the sort of sin that made the death of Christ necessary[…].”[12]

    v.30 “Insofar as we find this conception disturbing, we reveal our more fundamental discomfort with the very notion of God’s judgment.  Paul’s assertion stands in continuity with Israel’s prophetic tradition from Amos onward, and particularly with the theology of Deuteronomy, which proclaims that curses and misfortunes will fall upon Israel if they disregard the covenant that God has made with them[…]. [Paul] believes that God takes human sin seriously and sometimes acts to discipline those who defy his will.”[13]

    [1] Bruce B. Barton, et al., 1 Corinthians, Life Application Bible Commentary (Wheaton, IL: Tyndale, 1994) 680.

    [2] Richard B. Hays, First Corinthians, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching (Louisville, KY: John Knox Press, 1997) 184-85.

    [3] David E. Garland, 1 Corinthians, Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 2003) 514.

    [4] Richard B. Hays, First Corinthians, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching (Louisville, KY: John Knox Press, 1997) 191.

    [5] Ibid

    [6] Richard B. Hays, First Corinthians, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching (Louisville, KY: John Knox Press, 1997) 187-88.

    [7] Frank E. Gaebelein, Gen. Ed. Expositor’s Bible Commentary CD, (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1992) notes for 1 Corinthians.

    [8] Richard B. Hays, First Corinthians, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching (Louisville, KY: John Knox Press, 1997) 188-89.

    [9] Bruce B. Barton, et al., 1 Corinthians, Life Application Bible Commentary (Wheaton, IL: Tyndale, 1994) 682.

    [10] Richard B. Hays, First Corinthians, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching (Louisville, KY: John Knox Press, 1997) 196.

    [11] Richard B. Hays, First Corinthians, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching (Louisville, KY: John Knox Press, 1997) 199.

    [12] Richard B. Hays, First Corinthians, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching (Louisville, KY: John Knox Press, 1997) 201.

    [13] Richard B. Hays, First Corinthians, Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching (Louisville,KY: John Knox Press, 1997) 205-6.

  • BIBLE TEXT:

    1 Corinthians 11:1-16 (ESV) 

    1 Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ.

    2 Now I commend you because you remember me in everything and maintain the traditions even as I delivered them to you. 3 But I want you to understand that the head of every man is Christ, the head of a wife is her husband, and the head of Christ is God. 4 Every man who prays or prophesies with his head covered dishonors his head, 5 but every wife who prays or prophesies with her head uncovered dishonors her head, since it is the same as if her head were shaven. 6 For if a wife will not cover her head, then she should cut her hair short. But since it is disgraceful for a wife to cut off her hair or shave her head, let her cover her head.  7 For a man ought not to cover his head, since he is the image and glory of God, but woman is the glory of man. 8 For man was not made from woman, but woman from man. 9 Neither was man created for woman, but woman for man. 10 That is why a wife ought to have a symbol of authority on her head, because of the angels. 11 Nevertheless, in the Lord woman is not independent of man nor man of woman; 12 for as woman was made from man, so man is now born of woman. And all things are from God. 13 Judge for yourselves: is it proper for a wife to pray to God with her head uncovered? 14 Does not nature itself teach you that if a man wears long hair it is a disgrace for him, 15 but if a woman has long hair, it is her glory? For her hair is given to her for a covering. 16 If anyone is inclined to be contentious, we have no such practice, nor do the churches of God.

  • God [What truths about God’s person, activity or character does the text reveal?]

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December 4, 2019

1 Corinthians 10 – 2019-12-04

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 10 – COMMENTARY

  • BIBLE TEXT: 1 Corinthians 10:23-33 (ESV) 

    23 “All things are lawful,” but not all things are helpful. “All things are lawful,” but not all things build up. 24 Let no one seek his own good, but the good of his neighbor. 25 Eat whatever is sold in the meat market without raising any question on the ground of conscience. 26 For “the earth is the Lord’s, and the fullness thereof.” 27 If one of the unbelievers invites you to dinner and you are disposed to go, eat whatever is set before you without raising any question on the ground of conscience. 28 But if someone says to you, “This has been offered in sacrifice,” then do not eat it, for the sake of the one who informed you, and for the sake of conscience— 29 I do not mean your conscience, but his. For why should my liberty be determined by someone else’s conscience? 30 If I partake with thankfulness, why am I denounced because of that for which I give thanks?

    31 So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God. 32 Give no offense to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God, 33 just as I try to please everyone in everything I do, not seeking my own advantage, but that of many, that they may be saved.

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December 3, 2019

1 Corinthians 10 – 2019-12-03

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 10 – COMMENTARY

  • BIBLE TEXT: 1 Corinthians 10:18-22 (ESV)

    18 Consider the people of Israel: are not those who eat the sacrifices participants in the altar? 19 What do I imply then? That food offered to idols is anything, or that an idol is anything? 20 No, I imply that what pagans sacrifice they offer to demons and not to God. I do not want you to be participants with demons. 21 You cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons. You cannot partake of the table of the Lord and the table of demons. 22 Shall we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he?

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December 2, 2019

1 Corinthians 10 – 2019-12-02

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  • 1 CORINTHIANS 10 – COMMENTARY

  • BIBLE TEXT: 1 Corinthians 10:13-17 (ESV) 

    13 No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.

    14 Therefore, my beloved, flee from idolatry. 15 I speak as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say. 16 The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ? 17 Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread.

  • God [What truths about God’s person, activity or character does the text reveal?]

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  • Apply and obey [How does today’s text apply to me? How will I obey or respond to the truths from today’s text?]

  • Prayer 

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