Daily Devotion Text

May 24, 2022

Acts 11:1-18

Journal

Please use one of the prompts below to get your journaling started.

  • Explore your fears and what’s behind them.
  • Write about a relational conflict you are experiencing.
  • List out all that you are grateful for.
  • Recall a significant reaction, conversation or event.

Commentary

INTRODUCTION TO THE BOOK OF ACTS

CHAPTER 1 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 2 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 3 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 4 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 5 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 6 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 7 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 8 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 9 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 10 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 11 COMMENTARY

v.1: “A Gentile was anyone who was not a Jew; the Jewish believers are sometimes referred to as the ‘the circumcised believers’ (11:2).  Most Jewish believers thought that God offered salvation only to the Jews because God had given his law to them (Exodus 19, 20).  A group in Jerusalem believed that Gentiles could be saved, but only if they followed all the Jewish laws and traditions—in essence, if they became Jews.  Both were mistaken.  God chose the Jews and taught them his laws so they could bring the message of salvation to all people (see Genesis 12:3; Psalm 22:27; Isaiah 42:4, 49:6; 56:3-7;60:1-3; Jeremiah 16:19-21; Zechariah 2:11, Malachi 1:11; Romans 15:9-12).” [1]

vv.1-3: “‘The circumcised believers’ (hoi ek peritomes; lit., ‘those of the circumcision,’ usually meaning only ‘the Jews,’ but in context certainly connoting ‘Jewish Christians’ here) immediately confronted Peter and charged, ‘You went into the house of uncircumcised men and ate with them.’ This charge, while traditionally worded, was tantamount to saying that Peter had set aside Christianity’s Jewish features and thereby seriously endangered its relation with the nation.” [2]

v.8: “Impure or unclean.  Unacceptable according to dietary restrictions of the law, thought by some to be for health reasons and by others for religious reason.  The Jews gained insight into God’s holiness by visual lessons reinforced in their daily diet.” [3]

“God had promised throughout Scripture that he would reach the nations.  […] But this was an extremely difficult truth for Jews, even Jewish believers, to accept.  The Jewish believers understood how certain prophecies were fulfilled in Christ, but they overlooked other Old Testament teachings.” [4]

vv.19-30: “In restrained sentences these few words tell of one of the greatest events in history.  Now, for the first time, the gospel is deliberately preached to the Gentiles. Everything has been working up to this. There have been three steps on the ladder. First, Philip preached to the Samaritans; but the Samaritans after all were half Jewish and formed, as it were, a bridge, between the Jewish and the Gentile world.  Second, Peter accepted Cornelius; but it was Cornelius who took the initiative.  It was not the Christian Church who sought Cornelius; it was Cornelius who sought the Christian Church.  Further, it is stressed that Cornelius was a God-fearer and, therefore, on the fringes of the Jewish faith. Third, in Antioch, the Church did not go to people who were Jews or half Jews, nor wait to be approached by Gentiles seeking admission; of set purpose and without waiting for the invitation, it preached the gospel to the Gentiles. Christianity is finally launched on its worldwide mission.

Here we have a truly amazing thing. The Church has taken the most epoch-making of all steps; and we do not even know the names of the people who took that step. All we know is that they came from Cyprus and Cyrene.  They go down in history as nameless pioneers of Christ.  It has always been one of the tragedies of the Church that men have wished to be noticed and named when they did something worthwhile.  What the Church has always needed, perhaps more than anything else, is people who never care who gains the credit for it so long as the work is done.  These men may not have written their names in men’s books of history: but they have written them forever in God’s Book of Life.” [5]

“Antioch in North Syria by the Orontes River was the largest of sixteen cities in the eastern Mediterranean bearing that name.  They were so named because many kings of the Seleucid dynasty (who ruled the eastern part of Alexander the Great’s empire after his death) bore the name Antiochus.  With an estimated population of about 300,000 Antioch in Syria was the third largest city in the Roman empire, surpassed in population only by Rome and Alexandria.  It was also the seat of administration of the Roman province of Syria.  A large Jewish population lived there, estimates of which range from 22,000 to 65,000.

Antioch had lax morals, especially owing to cult prostitution at a shrine in Daphne, five miles south of the city.  Because it was an international commercial center, it was a cosmopolitan city.  People were accustomed to innovations there. ‘They had their rough corners rubbed smooth, and traditional attitudes which were taken so seriously in a place like Jerusalem did not matter much.’ According to Josephus, a large number of proselytes lived there. In fact, one of the seven men chosen to serve tables in Jerusalem was Nicolas, a proselyte from Antioch (6:5).  It was, then, an ideal place to be ‘the real birthplace of Gentile Christianity.’ It remained an important center of Christianity for many centuries.  It is now a part of Turkey and is called Antakya, with a relatively small population of about 40,000.’ [6] 

vv.22-26: “[Barnabas] introduced Paul into the circle of apostles (9:27).  He was chosen as their delegate to Antioch.  Barnabas was a ‘bridge-builder,’ one who was able to see the positive aspects in both sides of an issue and to mediate between perspectives.  That was the sort of person needed now to investigate the new mission […] Luke emphasizes these positive qualities in Barnabas. ‘He was a good man’ (v. 24), a phrase Luke used elsewhere only of Joseph of Arimathea (Luke 23:50).  He was ‘full of the Holy Spirit and faith,’ just like Stephen (Acts 6:5).  When Barnabas arrived in Antioch, far from criticizing the new undertaking, he was able to see the grace of God at work in all the Gentile conversions, and he rejoiced (v. 23). More than that, he encouraged them in the ministry, thus living up to his nickname of being the ‘Son of Encouragement’ (4:36).  This quality of encouragement, of looking for the best in others, would reappear when Barnabas interceded on Mark’s behalf (15:36-40). [7]

“With the growing missionary success in Antioch, Barnabas needed help; and Paul immediately came to mind.  Paul was in the area of his native Cilicia (cf. Acts 9:30; Gal 1:21), to which he had departed after his first visit to Jerusalem following his conversion.  The text of Acts is compressed and selective, but the most likely reconstruction of Pauline chronology from Gal 1-2 would indicate that some ten years or so had elapsed from the time he first departed from Cilicia to when Barnabas set out to find him.  The verb Luke employed (anazeteo) means to seek out and implies he had some difficulty in finding him.  Quite likely Paul was off somewhere busily engaged in missionary activity.  When Barnabas finally located Paul, he brought him back to Antioch where the two were heavily occupied in preaching and teaching to ‘great numbers’ (v. 26).  Likely they particularly continued the witness to Gentiles.  This would prepare them for their first mission together in Cyprus and southern Turkey (13:4-14:26).”[8] 

“Luke appended the interesting note to v. 26 that the term ‘Christian’ was first applied to disciples in Antioch.  This may be of more significance than might appear on first sight.  The term only occurs in two other places in the New Testament (Acts 26:28; 1 Peter 4:16).  In all three instances it is a term used by outsides to designate Christians.  Evidently the term was not originally used by Christians themselves.  They preferred terms like ‘believers, disciples and brothers.’  The first extensive usage by a Christian writer to designate fellow believers was by Ignatius, bishop of Antioch, around the turn of the second century.  The term (Christianoi) consists of the Greek word for Christ/Messiah (Christos) with the Latin ending ianus, meaning belonging to, identified by […] The term was often used by Roman writers to designate followers of Christ. The early usage in Antioch is perhaps indicative of two things.   For one, it is the sort of term Gentiles would have used and perhaps reflects the success of Antioch’s Gentile mission. Gentiles were dubbing their fellow Gentiles who because followers of Christ ‘Christians.’  Second, it reflects that Christianity was beginning to have an identity of its own and no longer was viewed as a totally Jewish entity.  Again, the success among Gentiles would have hastened this process in Antioch. [9] 

Bible Text

Acts 11:1-18 (ESV)

1 Now the apostles and the brothers who were throughout Judea heard that the Gentiles also had received the word of God. 2 So when Peter went up to Jerusalem, the circumcision party criticized him, saying, 3 “You went to uncircumcised men and ate with them.” 4 But Peter began and explained it to them in order: 5 “I was in the city of Joppa praying, and in a trance I saw a vision, something like a great sheet descending, being let down from heaven by its four corners, and it came down to me. 6 Looking at it closely, I observed animals and beasts of prey and reptiles and birds of the air. 7 And I heard a voice saying to me, ‘Rise, Peter; kill and eat.’ 8 But I said, ‘By no means, Lord; for nothing common or unclean has ever entered my mouth.’ 9 But the voice answered a second time from heaven, ‘What God has made clean, do not call common.’ 10 This happened three times, and all was drawn up again into heaven. 11 And behold, at that very moment three men arrived at the house in which we were, sent to me from Caesarea. 12 And the Spirit told me to go with them, making no distinction. These six brothers also accompanied me, and we entered the man’s house. 13 And he told us how he had seen the angel stand in his house and say, ‘Send to Joppa and bring Simon who is called Peter; 14 he will declare to you a message by which you will be saved, you and all your household.’

15 As I began to speak, the Holy Spirit fell on them just as on us at the beginning. 16 And I remembered the word of the Lord, how he said, ‘John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.’ 17 If then God gave the same gift to them as he gave to us when we believed in the Lord Jesus Christ, who was I that I could stand in God’s way?” 18 When they heard these things they fell silent. And they glorified God, saying, “Then to the Gentiles also God has granted repentance that leads to life.”

Go Deeper

Acts 11:1-18

•       God used Peter to preach to the Gentiles, corresponding with the final part of Jesus’ commission to his disciples to be his witnesses “to the ends of the earth” (1:8). How do the Jewish believers respond to this? 


[1] Life Application Study Bible, study notes, 1972.

[2] Gaebelein, Gen. Ed. Expositor’s Bible Commentary CD, notes for vv.1-3.

[3] Quest Study Bible, study notes 1522.

[4] Life Application Study Bible, study notes, 1972.               

[5] William Barclay, The Acts of the Apostles: The Daily Study Bible, (Philadelphia, PN: The Westminster Press, 1976)  88.

[6] Fernando, Acts, The NIV Application Commentary Series, 348.

[7] Polhill, Acts: The New American Commentary, 272.

[8] Polhill, Acts: The New American Commentary, 272-273.

[9] Polhill, Acts: The New American Commentary, 273.


Prayer

May 23, 2022

Prayer

Our church is going through a new devotional format, to devote Mondays and Fridays to prayer. We will continue our study through the Book of Acts on Tuesdays through Thursdays.

“Work, work, from morning until late at night. In fact, I have so much to do that I shall have to spend the first three hours in prayer.” – Martin Luther


Prayer of Gratitude

Prayer of Supplication


May 20, 2022

Prayer

Our church is going through a new devotional format, to devote Mondays and Fridays to prayer. We will continue our study through the Book of Acts on Tuesdays through Thursdays.

“Prayer is no petty duty, put into a corner; no piecemeal performance made out of the fragments of time which have been snatched from business and other engagements of life; but it means that the best of our time, the heart of our time and strength must be given.” – E.M. Bounds


Prayer of Gratitude

Prayer of Supplication


May 19, 2022

Acts 10:34-48(ESV)

Journal

Please use one of the prompts below to get your journaling started.

  • Explore your fears and what’s behind them.
  • Write about a relational conflict you are experiencing.
  • List out all that you are grateful for.
  • Recall a significant reaction, conversation or event.

Commentary

INTRODUCTION TO THE BOOK OF ACTS

CHAPTER 1 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 2 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 3 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 4 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 5 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 6 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 7 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 8 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 9 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 10 COMMENTARY

Bible Text: Acts 10:34-48 (ESV)

34 So Peter opened his mouth and said: “Truly I understand that God shows no partiality, 35 but in every nation anyone who fears him and does what is right is acceptable to him. 36 As for the word that he sent to Israel, preaching good news of peace through Jesus Christ (he is Lord of all), 37 you yourselves know what happened throughout all Judea, beginning from Galilee after the baptism that John proclaimed: 38 how God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power. He went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with him. 39 And we are witnesses of all that he did both in the country of the Jews and in Jerusalem. They put him to death by hanging him on a tree, 40 but God raised him on the third day and made him to appear, 41 not to all the people but to us who had been chosen by God as witnesses, who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. 42 And he commanded us to preach to the people and to testify that he is the one appointed by God to be judge of the living and the dead. 43 To him all the prophets bear witness that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name.”

44 While Peter was still saying these things, the Holy Spirit fell on all who heard the word. 45 And the believers from among the circumcised who had come with Peter were amazed, because the gift of the Holy Spirit was poured out even on the Gentiles. 46 For they were hearing them speaking in tongues and extolling God. Then Peter declared, 47 “Can anyone withhold water for baptizing these people, who have received the Holy Spirit just as we have?” 48 And he commanded them to be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ.

Go Deeper

Acts 10:34-35

•       What are the characteristics of those whom God accepts?

Acts 10:39, 42

•       What works of God have I been a witness to and can testify about? What do they reveal about God? And who are those whom God has placed in my life to testify to?

Acts 10:45

•       Why were the circumcised believers amazed and what misconceptions got corrected?



Prayer

May 18, 2022

Acts 10:17-33(ESV)

Journal

Please use one of the prompts below to get your journaling started.

  • Explore your fears and what’s behind them.
  • Write about a relational conflict you are experiencing.
  • List out all that you are grateful for.
  • Recall a significant reaction, conversation or event.

Commentary

INTRODUCTION TO THE BOOK OF ACTS

CHAPTER 1 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 2 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 3 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 4 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 5 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 6 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 7 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 8 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 9 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 10 COMMENTARY

Bible Text: Acts 10:17-33 (ESV)

17 Now while Peter was inwardly perplexed as to what the vision that he had seen might mean, behold, the men who were sent by Cornelius, having made inquiry for Simon’s house, stood at the gate 18 and called out to ask whether Simon who was called Peter was lodging there. 19 And while Peter was pondering the vision, the Spirit said to him, “Behold, three men are looking for you. 20 Rise and go down and accompany them without hesitation, for I have sent them.” 21 And Peter went down to the men and said, “I am the one you are looking for. What is the reason for your coming?” 22 And they said, “Cornelius, a centurion, an upright and God-fearing man, who is well spoken of by the whole Jewish nation, was directed by a holy angel to send for you to come to his house and to hear what you have to say.” 23 So he invited them in to be his guests.

The next day he rose and went away with them, and some of the brothers from Joppa accompanied him. 24 And on the following day they entered Caesarea. Cornelius was expecting them and had called together his relatives and close friends. 25 When Peter entered, Cornelius met him and fell down at his feet and worshiped him. 26 But Peter lifted him up, saying, “Stand up; I too am a man.” 27 And as he talked with him, he went in and found many persons gathered. 28 And he said to them, “You yourselves know how unlawful it is for a Jew to associate with or to visit anyone of another nation, but God has shown me that I should not call any person common or unclean. 29 So when I was sent for, I came without objection. I ask then why you sent for me.”

30 And Cornelius said, “Four days ago, about this hour, I was praying in my house at the ninth hour, and behold, a man stood before me in bright clothing 31 and said, ‘Cornelius, your prayer has been heard and your alms have been remembered before God. 32 Send therefore to Joppa and ask for Simon who is called Peter. He is lodging in the house of Simon, a tanner, by the sea.’ 33 So I sent for you at once, and you have been kind enough to come. Now therefore we are all here in the presence of God to hear all that you have been commanded by the Lord.”

Go Deeper

  • Continuing the character study of Cornelius, what are some observations and lessons?
  • Continue to reflect on the role of prayer in this chapter.
  • Given the barriers Peter had to overcome in order to go to Cornelius’s house, reflect on Peter’s words in v. 28: “God has shown me that I should not call any person common or unclean.” Why is this a fundamental Christian principle? How much has this truth become a reality in my perspective towards myself and others? 


Prayer

May 17, 2022

Acts 10:1-16(ESV)

Journal

Please use one of the prompts below to get your journaling started.

  • Explore your fears and what’s behind them.
  • Write about a relational conflict you are experiencing.
  • List out all that you are grateful for.
  • Recall a significant reaction, conversation or event.

Commentary

INTRODUCTION TO THE BOOK OF ACTS

CHAPTER 1 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 2 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 3 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 4 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 5 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 6 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 7 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 8 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 9 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 10 COMMENTARY

vv.17-19: “Grappling with what we are uncomfortable. In verses 17 and 19 Peter was grappling intensely regarding the meaning of the vision when the Holy Spirit spoke to him. At first Peter vehemently refused to be open to change […] He had strong convictions. But when he sensed that God was indeed teaching him something new, he seriously considered the implications of the vision. Thus, both divine guidance and Peter’s willingness to grasp what God was showing him combined to produce a change in his thinking, even though it was something he was uncomfortable with. A passion for obedience makes God’s servants open to changes with which they may at first be uncomfortable.” [1] 

vv.23b-24: “Six of the Joppa believers accompanied Peter to Caesarea the next day (cf. 11:12)–a wise action in view of the questions that would later be raised at Jerusalem.”[2]

vv.25-28: “Cornelius shows great humility for a centurion, for like the centurion whom Jesus encountered (Luke 7:6), he ‘fell at [Peter’s] feet in reverence’ (v.25). But Peter will have none of this, as such reverence is reserved only for God. (v.26) Such Acts of reverence to respected people were not unusual in the Near East in those days. In fact, it was ‘typical of the welcome a hero receives in the Greek novel.’ But Peter will not risk anything that might suggest that he is accepting the type of respect that is due to God alone.”

“Peter’s discovery, as he explains to his audience, is the pivotal message of this whole passage: ‘God has shown me that I should not call any man impure [koinos] or unclean’ (v.28). Here it has the idea of ‘being ritually unacceptable either as a result of defilement or because of the very nature of the object itself.’ A big shift has taken place in Peter’s thinking, for he now realizes that no longer are the typical Jewish distinctions among people significant. They have been rendered void once and for all. In this episode Jew and Gentile have come together.

An attitude of repentance. When Peter realized that he had been wrong about his earlier prejudices, he readily admitted that in his conversation with Cornelius (v.28). When he preached to the crowd, he again publicly confessed the lesson he had learned: God shows no favoritism.” [3]

v.45: “What was so amazing to Peter’s friends? What they saw with their eyes, they could not grasp with their minds.  They had always been taught that the promises of Scripture were only for God’s chosen people. They could not imagine how Gentiles could be made righteous without first becoming Jews.  It confused them to see God take the initiative and give the Holy Spirit to the Gentiles before they could earn his favor by following the Law.” [4]

Bible Text: Acts 10:1-16 (ESV)

1 At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion of what was known as the Italian Cohort, 2 a devout man who feared God with all his household, gave alms generously to the people, and prayed continually to God. 3 About the ninth hour of the day he saw clearly in a vision an angel of God come in and say to him, “Cornelius.” 4 And he stared at him in terror and said, “What is it, Lord?” And he said to him, “Your prayers and your alms have ascended as a memorial before God. 5 And now send men to Joppa and bring one Simon who is called Peter. 6 He is lodging with one Simon, a tanner, whose house is by the sea.” 7 When the angel who spoke to him had departed, he called two of his servants and a devout soldier from among those who attended him, 8 and having related everything to them, he sent them to Joppa.

9 The next day, as they were on their journey and approaching the city, Peter went up on the housetop about the sixth hour to pray. 10 And he became hungry and wanted something to eat, but while they were preparing it, he fell into a trance 11 and saw the heavens opened and something like a great sheet descending, being let down by its four corners upon the earth. 12 In it were all kinds of animals and reptiles and birds of the air. 13 And there came a voice to him: “Rise, Peter; kill and eat.” 14 But Peter said, “By no means, Lord; for I have never eaten anything that is common or unclean.” 15 And the voice came to him again a second time, “What God has made clean, do not call common.” 16 This happened three times, and the thing was taken up at once to heaven.

Go Deeper

Acts 10:1-16

  • What are some observations and lessons I can draw from a character study of Cornelius?
  • What is the role of prayer in this chapter? What lesson is here regarding how God can lead my life to those who seek him?

[1] Fernando, Acts, The NIV Application Commentary Series.

[2] Gaebelein, Gen. Ed. Expositor’s Bible Commentary CD, notes for vv.23b-24.

[3] Fernando, Acts, The NIV Application Commentary Series.

[4] Quest Study Bible, study notes, 1521.


Prayer

May 16, 2022

Prayer

Our church is going through a new devotional format, to devote Mondays and Fridays to prayer. We will continue our study through the Book of Acts on Tuesdays through Thursdays.

“The blessing of the closet does not depend on the strong or fervent feeling with which I pray, but on the love and power of the Father to whom I there entrust my needs. Remember your Father sees and hears in secret. Go there and stay there; then leave in confidence.” – Andrew Murray


Prayer of Gratitude

Prayer of Supplication


May 13, 2022

Prayer

Our church is going through a new devotional format, to devote Mondays and Fridays to prayer. We will continue our study through the Book of Acts on Tuesdays through Thursdays.

“There is no way that Christians, in a private capacity, can do so much to promote the work of God and advance the kingdom of Christ as by prayer.” –   Jonathan Edwards


Prayer of Gratitude

Prayer of Supplication


May 12, 2022

Acts 9:32-43(ESV)

Journal

Please use one of the prompts below to get your journaling started.

  • Explore your fears and what’s behind them.
  • Write about a relational conflict you are experiencing.
  • List out all that you are grateful for.
  • Recall a significant reaction, conversation or event.

Commentary

INTRODUCTION TO THE BOOK OF ACTS

CHAPTER 1 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 2 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 3 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 4 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 5 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 6 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 7 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 8 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 9 COMMENTARY

Bible Text:

Acts 9:32-43 (ESV)

32 Now as Peter went here and there among them all, he came down also to the saints who lived at Lydda. 33 There he found a man named Aeneas, bedridden for eight years, who was paralyzed. 34 And Peter said to him, “Aeneas, Jesus Christ heals you; rise and make your bed.” And immediately he rose. 35 And all the residents of Lydda and Sharon saw him, and they turned to the Lord.

36 Now there was in Joppa a disciple named Tabitha, which, translated, means Dorcas. She was full of good works and Acts of charity. 37 In those days she became ill and died, and when they had washed her, they laid her in an upper room. 38 Since Lydda was near Joppa, the disciples, hearing that Peter was there, sent two men to him, urging him, “Please come to us without delay.” 39 So Peter rose and went with them. And when he arrived, they took him to the upper room. All the widows stood beside him weeping and showing tunics and other garments that Dorcas made while she was with them. 40 But Peter put them all outside, and knelt down and prayed; and turning to the body he said, “Tabitha, arise.” And she opened her eyes, and when she saw Peter she sat up. 41 And he gave her his hand and raised her up. Then calling the saints and widows, he presented her alive.42 And it became known throughout all Joppa, and many believed in the Lord. 43 And he stayed in Joppa for many days with one Simon, a tanner.

Go Deeper

Acts 9:32-43

  • What can I learn from this picture of Peter going from town to town to minister to the established and growing churches?
  • What can I infer about Tabitha’s character and the relationships within the early church at Joppa) given the scene at her deathbed?   
  • Note the similarities between this miracle and the raising of Jairus’s daughter (Mark 5:35-43). Here is a picture of how Peter has taken up the work that Jesus carried out while he was on earth. In what ways can I imitate Jesus and take up his ministry in my life? 

[1] Acts, The NIV Application Commentary Series, p.302

[2]  Acts, The NIV Application Commentary Series, p.302-4.

[3] John Stott, The Spirit, the Church, and the World, (Intervarsity Press, 1990) 178-9.


Prayer

May 11, 2022

Acts 9:20-31 (ESV)

Journal

Please use one of the prompts below to get your journaling started.

  • Explore your fears and what’s behind them.
  • Write about a relational conflict you are experiencing.
  • List out all that you are grateful for.
  • Recall a significant reaction, conversation or event.

Commentary

INTRODUCTION TO THE BOOK OF ACTS

CHAPTER 1 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 2 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 3 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 4 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 5 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 6 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 7 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 8 COMMENTARY

CHAPTER 9 COMMENTARY

Bible Text: Acts 9:20-31 (ESV)

20 And immediately he proclaimed Jesus in the synagogues, saying, “He is the Son of God.” 21 And all who heard him were amazed and said, “Is not this the man who made havoc in Jerusalem of those who called upon this name? And has he not come here for this purpose, to bring them bound before the chief priests?” 22 But Saul increased all the more in strength, and confounded the Jews who lived in Damascus by proving that Jesus was the Christ.

23 When many days had passed, the Jews plotted to kill him, 24 but their plot became known to Saul. They were watching the gates day and night in order to kill him, 25 but his disciples took him by night and let him down through an opening in the wall, lowering him in a basket.

26 And when he had come to Jerusalem, he attempted to join the disciples. And they were all afraid of him, for they did not believe that he was a disciple. 27 But Barnabas took him and brought him to the apostles and declared to them how on the road he had seen the Lord, who spoke to him, and how at Damascus he had preached boldly in the name of Jesus. 28 So he went in and out among them at Jerusalem, preaching boldly in the name of the Lord. 29 And he spoke and disputed against the Hellenists. But they were seeking to kill him. 30 And when the brothers learned this, they brought him down to Caesarea and sent him off to Tarsus.

31 So the church throughout all Judea and Galilee and Samaria had peace and was being built up. And walking in the fear of the Lord and in the comfort of the Holy Spirit, it multiplied.

Go Deeper

Acts 9:20-31

  • What can I learn from the fact that Saul immediately started proclaiming Jesus in the synagogues and had “his disciples” (v.25) by the time he had to make his escape from Damascus?
  • What lessons can we learn from the way Saul’s life was targeted from the very start of his ministry as an apostle of Jesus, and from the ways he survived?

[1] Acts, The NIV Application Commentary Series, p.302

[2]  Acts, The NIV Application Commentary Series, p.302-4.

[3] John Stott, The Spirit, the Church, and the World, (Intervarsity Press, 1990) 178-9.


Prayer

Scroll to top